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Marlborough School Student Newspaper
The Student News Site of Marlborough School

The UltraViolet

The Student News Site of Marlborough School

The UltraViolet

To kill a mocking-book
To kill a mocking-book
February 21, 2024

Holiday movie must-watches

Holiday+movie+must-watches

It’s officially time to get hyped for the holidays, and what better way to do so than to sit down with some cozy holiday classics? Below are my top three movie recs, in no particular order, to really get into that seasonal spirit.

Die Hard (1988): Debate all you want, “Die Hard” is a holiday movie to the core. Even if my pleas and the legions of Letterboxd reviewers can’t convince you, one should at least acknowledge that it’s a good break from other overtly seasonal holiday classics. The action offers constant excitement; Alexander Godunov prances across the screen in all his former ballet glory, Bruce Willis bleeds and Alan Rickman falls off a building. As silly and one-dimensional the characters may be, it’s still a wildly good time. And isn’t that what the holiday season is all about?

Saint Young Men (2012): Like “Die Hard,” this movie’s holiday relatability is a bit questionable. It follows anime-style Jesus and Buddha as they take a break from saving souls to vacation in Japan. Despite its holy premise, this film has little to do with religion. In a moment of absolute artistic genius (mentioned at risk of spoilers), Jesus forgets that Christmas is his “birthday.” Of course, one must suspend their disbelief because popular scholarship seems to agree that Jesus was not actually born on Christmas, but it still makes for a pretty good joke. Instead of scolding the viewer for forgetting the “true meaning” of Christmas, Jesus celebrates it with modern consumerist glee by enjoying the flashing lights and preparing a gift for Buddha — from Santa.

The Nightmare Before Christmas (1993): This movie is a masterpiece and I will always cry about it. Featuring innovative surrealism, an excellent score and an imaginative world, “The Nightmare Before Christmas” has cemented itself in the holiday movie canon. Always entertaining, Jack Skellington’s perennial dissatisfaction and eventual self-fulfillment leave the viewer content. I also adore this movie because my neighbor used to put a life-sized figure of Jack Skellington on her roof and leave him there from Halloween to New Year’s Eve. He’s literally my holiday icon. 

Obviously, this list in no way encapsulates the multitude of iconic holiday movies in existence. Notable but highly valued absentees include “Home Alone”(1990), “It’s a Wonderful Life” (1946), Adam Sandler’s “Crazy Eight Nights” (2002), “Elf” (2003) and the absolute dumpster fire that is the Hallmark Channel. I truly feel that these three films, above all else, get me so ready for the day Mariah Carey decides to defrost. Hopefully they serve you well. I wish you all nothing but the best for this winter break!

 

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